New Comprehensive Health Snapshot of All Your Microsoft Cloud Services from Office365Mon

When we started our new Azure monitoring services at AzureServiceMon.Com, one of our goals was to be able to provide a more comprehensive view of all the Microsoft cloud services you are using.  At Office365Mon.Com we already monitor a wide range of Office 365 services, such as SharePoint Online, Exchange Online, One Drive for Business, Power BI, and Skype for Business.  The number of services we monitor there has grown steadily over the last couple of years and will continue to do so.

Spinning up a new service to monitor Azure though gave us an opportunity to give much broader coverage across the Microsoft service line, because many customers that use Office 365 also use Azure.  We went through the first iteration of the service features and brought on availability monitoring for Azure services this summer.  Based on feedback from that, we added a pretty extensive second set of features around monitoring the performance of services in Azure, down to the level of things like disk IO, CPU consumption, memory consumption, network IO, etc.

Up to this point, these two monitoring services served as “islands of data” with information on your different Microsoft cloud services.  Today, we are bringing those together in a new comprehensive view we call the Microsoft Cloud Command Center.  This feature is currently available in Office365Mon.Com, and will soon also be available in AzureServiceMon.Com.  To start with, here’s what the Command Center looks like:

ccc

As you can see, what we’ve done is brought together information from these two services and loaded up all of the key metrics that you need about everything that’s going on with your Microsoft cloud services.  We start with outages, because customers generally care about that most.  You can quickly see when your last few outages for both Office 365 and Azure were, and for what resources.

As you keep going down you can see what the most recent – like last 90 minutes or so – performance has been like in your specific tenant in Office 365.  Next to that we show you what the latest availability is for all of the Office 365 resources that we’re monitoring for you. This is near real-time data of your live tenant based on our own health probes that fire off every minute or two.

Down below that you can see the latest availability status of all of your Azure resources that we’re monitoring.  You can drill into each of the different resource types you see there – such as web sites, SQL databases, etc. – and find out the status of each one.  Finally, next to it you can see the latest set of metric alerts that were triggered.  Metric alerts are a feature of AzureServiceMon that lets you set performance thresholds for metrics, and when they go outside those boundaries you are notified and we track it for you.

The new Cloud Command Center provides a true all-up, single pane of glass view of the health of all of your Microsoft cloud services.  We have other features on the roadmap for Office365Mon and AzureServiceMon, and as we bring them online we’ll continue to expand the Cloud Command Center as appropriate.

We think you’ll find this single snapshot view of your cloud services very valuable.  You can start with it today by visiting Office365Mon at https://www.office365mon.com/Features/CloudCommand.  If you haven’t created an Office365Mon subscription yet, then just go to our home page at https://www.office365mon.com and click the big Start Now link.  If you haven’t created an AzureServiceMon subscription yet, then try it out now by visiting the site at https://azureservicemon.com and clicking the Start Now link on the home page there.

Bringing this wide range of critical operational data into easy to use views is one of the things we do best at Office365Mon and AzureServiceMon.  As we say, you need to stay in the know to be in control, and the new Cloud Command Center will help you do just that.

From Sunny Phoenix,

Steve

 

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Office365Mon and AzureServiceMon Webhook Integration with Microsoft Flow

One of the things we get asked about rather often at Office365Mon.Com and AzureServiceMon.Com is how to do custom alerts and other workflow scenarios when an outage or some other interesting thing happens – maybe the version of your SharePoint Online tenant changes, you aren’t getting any search results in your tenant, etc.  We’ve had a webhook feature for some time that was designed specifically to allow customers to address these one-off custom scenarios, but previously have always talked about it as writing some custom code and web site to process it.  Now, based on yet another great suggestion from one of our truly brilliant customers, we’ve put together some information on how you can do all of that without writing any code at all!  Instead we’re going to use the graphical workflow designer in Microsoft Flow.

NOTE:  If you want to see a video of this whole process, check out our YouTube recording of this here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GoK8LiTMd7o.

To begin with, go to the Microsoft Flow site here:  https://flow.microsoft.com.  Click on My Flows to see the Flows you have and/or design new ones:

flow1

Once you get into your flows, we’ll click on Create from blank to create our new Flow:

flow2

When you create a new Flow, we’re going to look for an Http Request connector.  The webhook fires as a simple HTTP request with some JSON.  To begin, click on Search Connectors:

flow3

Search for “http request” and click on Request – When an HTTP Request is received in the search results:

flow4

The next thing that’s going to happen is that it will ask you for the schema of the JSON that’s going to be sent over in the Http request.  We’ve put that together for you, but it is subject to change over time as we add new monitoring features.  We’ll never break any existing schema, but we may add to it.  As of today you can copy and paste the following JSON schema into the JSON Schema edit box; alternatively you may want to download from our web site at https://office365mon.com/webhookschema.txt because the formatting in the blog will likely get you all messed up:

 

{

“type”: “object”,

“properties”: {

“SubscriptionId”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“CompanyName”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“WebhookNotificationType”: {

“type”: “number”

},

“NotificationOutageInfo”: {

“type”: “object”,

“properties”: {

“Resource”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“ResourceType”: {

“type”: “number”

},

“OutageNotificationType”: {

“type”: “number”

},

“DistributedProbeHostName”: {

“type”: “string”

}

}

},

“NotificationServiceStatusInfo”: {

“type”: “object”,

“properties”: {

“ServiceName”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“FeatureName”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“CurrentStatus”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“PreviousStatus”: {

“type”: “string”

}

}

},

“NotificationQueryInfo”: {

“type”: “object”,

“properties”: {

“Resource”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“NumResults”: {

“type”: “number”

},

“Results”: {

“type”: “string”

}

}

},

“NotificationLongRunningProbeInfo”: {

“type”: “object”,

“properties”: {

“DistributedProbeHostName”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“Duration”: {

“type”: “number”

},

“Threshold”: {

“type”: “number”

}

}

},

“NotificationVersionInfo”: {

“type”: “object”,

“properties”: {

“OldVersion”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“NewVersion”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“ResourceType”: {

“type”: “number”

},

“ResourceAddress”: {

“type”: “string”

}

}

},

“NotificationOfflineHostInfo”: {

“type”: “object”,

“properties”: {

“DistributedProbeHostName”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“LastProbeTime”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“MaxOfflineTime”: {

“type”: “number”

}

}

},

“NotificationMailTransportInfo”: {

“type”: “object”,

“properties”: {

“TimeSent”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“MinutesToDeliver”: {

“type”: “number”

},

“DelayInformationType”: {

“type”: “number”

}

}

},

“NotificationMonitoredListInfo”: {

“type”: “object”,

“properties”: {

“ListName”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“SiteAddress”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“MaxListSize”: {

“type”: “number”

},

“ActualListSize”: {

“type”: “number”

},

“MaxRenderTime”: {

“type”: “number”

},

“ActualRenderTime”: {

“type”: “number”

}

}

},

“NotificationAzureMetricAlertInfo”: {

“type”: “object”,

“properties”: {

“ResourceName”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“ResourceId”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“AzureSubscriptionId”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“MetricFriendlyPropertyName”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“MetricInternalPropertyName”: {

“type”: “string”

},

“MetricValue”: {

“type”: “number”

},

“MetricAlertValue”: {

“type”: “number”

}

}

}

}

}

Once you’ve pasted the JSON schema in, we can now focus on this scenario using the data provided in the webhook.  We want to route an email message to a different group depending upon which type of resource triggers an outage notification.  To start that part of the Flow, click the New step button, then click Add a Condition:

flow5

In the Condition widget, click in the Choose A Value field and select the WebhookNotificationType field from the JSON schema:

flow6

For this scenario – to route messages to different groups when an outage occurs – create the condition for when WebhookNotificationType equals 1, which is an outage:

flow7

In the If Yes widget, click the “…More” link and select the Add Condition.  This is how we’ll select which type of resource created the outage notification, and send an email to the appropriate group in our organization:

flow8

In the Condition 2 widget, select ResourceType from the JSON schema fields.  It’s worth noting that the schema displayed below doesn’t distinguish between which data type the fields belong to.  For example, if you look at the JSON schema provided, you’ll see that both the NotificationOutageInfo and  NotificationVersionInfo objects have a ResourceType property.  While I didn’t see a clear way to distinguish between them when using Flow’s designer, you can always export the Flow when you’re done.  It includes the fully-qualified property names so you can ensure you selected the right object.  For this particular scenario, I recommend just selecting the first item in the list when it appears more than once.  That’s because the schema describes the fields for outage info first.  Here’s what the Flow designer looks like as you add this condition:

flow9

Now you can set the value according to how you want to route outage messages.  For example, a ResourceType of 0 equals SharePoint Online, a ResourceType of 1 equals Exchange Online, and so on.  The entire list of possible ResourceType values is documented in our Subscription Management SDK, which you can download from https://www.office365mon.com/Office365Mon_Subscription_Management_API.pdf.  Here’s the completed condition for the case when the outage notification is for SharePoint Online:

flow10

Now you can add an action to send a message to the appropriate group when it is a SharePoint Online outage.  To do that, begin by clicking the Add an action link:

flow11

Click the Send an email action:

flow12

Now you can fill out all the details of the email that should be sent when a SharePoint Online outage occurs:

flow13

When you’re creating the content for the email, you can plug in values from the JSON that is sent over.  Here we’ll add the name of the Office365Mon subscription that triggered this notification; the subscription name is kept in the Company Name field:

flow14

In the body of the email, we’ll include all the details that are sent over in the JSON.  They may not all have values – for example DistributedProbeHostName will be empty if the outage notification is coming from one of our cloud probes instead of one of our Distributed Probe agents – but they will all have some kind of value no matter what, even if it is blank.

Here’s an example of the completed email:

flow15

Once that’s filled out, we can click the “…More” link at the bottom again, and create another branch for an Exchange Online outage, etc.:

flow16

We can keep going this way until we’ve covered all our scenarios.  For any other cases where we don’t have a specific group to route to, on the last condition we can have the “If no” condition send an email to a general support alias.

When you’re done, click the Create flow link at the top to save your changes.

flow17

Once the flow is saved, you will finally get the Url that the Flow will be “listening” on for webhooks.  You need to copy this Url into the webhook property of each Office365Mon or AzureServiceMon subscription you want to use it on.  To find the Url, click the widget for the Http Request trigger at the top that was used to start this Flow:

flow18

When you do that, you’ll see the HTTP POST URL property, which is the Url that the JSON from the webhook will go to; copy it and paste into your Office365Mon subscription:

flow19

Now at Office365Mon or AzureServiceMon, you can paste in the Url.  For Office365Mon.Com go to https://www.office365mon.com/Signup/SignIn; for AzureServiceMon go to https://azureservicemon.com/Configure/AzureCore.  Scroll down to the Notification Info section and plug the Url into the Webhook Address field:

flow20

After you click the Update button it will be saved and we’ll start sending data over to the Flow whenever a notification fires.  You can still have other email addresses to which we’ll send out notifications – it’s totally up to you.  You can (and should) also click the Test button, and we’ll send a quick webhook and let you know if it arrived successfully or not.

Once you’ve done that, go back to the Flow designer tab in your browser and click the Done link to finish up your Flow:

flow21

After you do that, you can see all the instances where your Flow was invoked, i.e. when Office365Mon or AzureServiceMon sent over a notification for things like an Azure availability monitoring issue, an Azure metric monitoring alert, a SharePoint Online version change, Exchange Online outage, etc, etc, etc.

flow22

If you click on any of them, you can see how they were processed.  The first on at the bottom was added when I clicked the Test button for the webhook in the Office365Mon site.  The WebhookNotificationType for it was 0, so none of the conditions for firing our Flow were met.  The second one though fired when there was a SharePoint Online outage starting.  By drilling into it we can see the details of how the Flow was processed:

flow23

When you look at the “Send an email” widget at the bottom, you can see the values that came over from the JSON as they were plugged into the email template we created.

That’s it – that’s the whole process.  Not a single line of code was written.  After you spend a few minutes getting used to Flow, it will literally only take you a few minutes to write workflows like this.  It gives you a very powerful way to connect important Azure availability monitoring and Office 365 monitoring data into any kind of workflow that’s important to your business.

I hope you all find this useful.  Again, many thanks to the awesome customer of ours that suggested this approach.  As always, start out at https://azureservicemon.com or https://office365mon.com and create a new monitoring subscription, and then the rest is all downhill.

From Sunny Phoenix,

Steve

 

New Simplified Azure Resource Metric Monitoring from AzureServiceMon

For those of you who missed our beta release announcement, AzureServiceMon is a new service from the company that brought you Office365Mon. We have just released a significant new addition to the service this week, which we call Azure Metric Monitoring.

When AzureServiceMon released beta 1, we provided availability monitoring and notifications for a number of your Azure resource types. It’s all wrapped up in a simple to use interface that regularly inventories your collection of Azure resources so as you change what you’re using, you don’t need to try and keep your monitoring in sync. One of the first pieces of feedback we got from the beta 1 release was that customers wanted more. Specifically, not only do they want to know when their services are down, but they wanted a way to “peek inside” to see how their various resources are doing before they go down. That’s how Azure Metric Monitoring came to be.

Using Azure Metric Monitoring is just as simple as setting up availability monitoring for it. To begin with, you go to our site at https://azureservicemon.com and configure availability monitoring. Spoiler alert – that involves about 2 minutes to fill in a couple of fields and check some boxes – incredibly easy. After you’ve done that, you can go to our Configure Metric Monitoring page at https://azureservicemon.com/Configure/Metrics. You’ll see another very easy to use interface that looks like this:

AzMetMon1

What’s great about this approach is that it takes the same very simple and very easy approach we use for availability monitoring. You don’t need to go to the Azure portal and try and create a bunch of policies on each of the different resources you have. Instead, you can come in here and in one place – set the thresholds you want to use for notifications for *all* your resources at once. Just click on the resource type bar – i.e. SQL Database Metrics, Virtual Machines Metrics, etc. – to set the thresholds for those resource types. Click the Update button and you’re done.

After that, we do all the heavy lifting for you. Want to know when the CPU utilization on your SQL Server databases rises above 75%? Want to know when the average response time of the pages on your web sites is more than 10 seconds? How about what kind of network bandwidth you’ve been chewing up with your virtual machines? Or how many queries have been throttled by Search services? The list of possibilities goes on and on here. When any of these thresholds on any of your resources are exceeded, you quickly get notifications about it. Just like all our other notifications, you can get emails, text messages, and/or use our webhook feature so you can plug in your own workflow, on premise notification systems, on premise issue tracking systems, etc.

In addition to that, there are also reports (and more coming) that you can use to get details on what the metric statistics are for all of the resources that we’re watching for you. For example, here’s a set of metrics on all of our Azure web sites:

AzMetMon2

You can see the most recent 24 hours’ worth of metrics here, but we’ll also have reports that show you what the hourly averages, sums and counts are like over the last week, as well as monthly summaries.

Azure Metric Monitoring is available today as part of our beta 1 service release of AzureServiceMon. It’s free to use while we’re in the beta release, and when you participate you will find other options to extend your free usage once we deliver our RTM release. Check out the Beta 1 Readme for more details on that, as well as to learn about all of the other interesting aspects of this first release.

Azure Metric Monitoring was added based on feedback from our customers using the initial release of AzureServiceMon. Try it out and let us know what you think, and maybe we can get your feature requests added to the service too!

Thanks from Sunny Phoenix,

Steve

 

Azure Availability Monitoring Made Simple at AzureServiceMon

Today we are excited to announce the Beta 1 release of our new Azure availability monitoring service – AzureServiceMon.Com.  We’ve taken all of the great IP and architecture that we’ve used at Office365Mon.Com to build a very powerful, yet incredibly simple to use, service for monitoring the availability of your Microsoft Azure resources.

Getting started is quite simple and for most folks will literally only take a minute or two to get up and running.  You’ll go in and create a new AzureServiceMon subscription, and then tell us to go inventory the list of resources you have with your Azure subscription.  Go grab a cup of coffee, but be quick about it because it normally only takes a minute for us to inventory all of your Azure resources.  Then it’s as simple as checking boxes next to the types of resources that you want us to monitor.  Here’s an example:

AzMon_Configure

After that, well…you’re basically done!  We start our monitoring thing at that point.  You get all of the same great notification options as we have at Office365Mon – emails, text messages, and webhook notifications.  Once we’ve started monitoring, almost immediately you’ll be able to get a snapshot view of what’s going on when you visit your My Info page:

AzureMon_MyInfo

With a quick glance here, I can see I have one or more Traffic Manager outages that are occurring, and if I click on that item it will expand to show me the latest status of each of my Traffic Manager resources so I can see exactly what’s going on.

We also start out with a nice collection of reports for you to use that display summary data for all of the health checks we perform and outages we track.  This includes a great pivot table view of your data, so you can quickly and easily slice and dice your numbers by things like resource Location, resource group, Azure resource type, etc.  Here’s a quick example with a variety of slicers and counts:

AzMon_PivotTable

There’s a lot here to get started with, but as is always our goal, we’ve tried to make it as simple as possible to get going and start using it.  Everyone can use it for free during the beta release, and if you check out our Beta 1 Readme PDF, you’ll see how you can sign up to get additional free months of monitoring after we complete our beta cycle.

These kinds of releases are also always the best time to give us your feedback about what you like or what you would like to see.  It gives you an opportunity to help shape the service into something that works well for you.

So, for monitoring the availability of your Azure resources, go check out https://azureservicemon.com today and click on the big Start Now link to get started.  For monitoring Office 365, go to https://www.office365mon.com and use our Start Now link there.

As always, we appreciate your feedback and look forward to building another great monitoring service for you.

From Sunny Phoenix,

Steve

 

Azure Services Monitoring Beta Sign Up

Over the last few years Office365Mon began life as a service to monitor Office 365, and grew from nothing to one of the leading solutions available today.  One of the keys to our growth has been a willingness to listen to customers about what they want, but more importantly – ACT upon what our customers want.  One of the things we’ve heard many times is “we want to monitor our Azure services too”.  Well, as I’ve had the good luck to say many times here, “you ask, we deliver”.

Here at Office365Mon we are in the process of working to bring you a new comprehensive monitoring solution for Microsoft Azure services.  This new service is going to focus primarily on monitoring the availability of key services in Azure.  At launch, we expect to have monitoring available for more than a dozen different kinds of resources, such as SQL Azure databases, web apps, virtual machines, CDNs, event hubs, the Search service, Service Bus, and more.  We also have plans for many additional services, and will be building and deploying them over time.

During the course of building and growing Office365Mon, we built our service entirely on Azure Active Directory and a wide ranging set of Azure services.  Over time we’ve built up quite an appreciation and understanding of these services.  We’re able to take our proven scalable and secure architecture we use for monitoring Office 365 and apply it directly to monitoring these Azure services.  This should give you a high degree of confidence based on the longstanding quality of Office365Mon.

We expect this service – named AzureServiceMon – to beta launch later this summer.  Now is the chance for you to sign up for the beta and see for yourself first hand what it can do.  Getting signed up is quite simple – just go to our new site at https://azureservicemon.com and click the Sign Up link.

I hope you’ll take advantage of this opportunity to try it out and give us feedback on what works well, what needs more work, and what additional features YOU would like to see.  Feedback from customers like you is what drives the many features you see in our services today.  If you have any questions, you can send them to us at support@azureservicemon.com.

From Sunny Phoenix,

Steve

Office365Mon Now Offers Monitoring Out of Regional Data Centers Starting with Germany

Office365Mon

Be in the know. Be in control

Office365Mon is now available to be run out of regional Azure data centers around the globe.  In addition to the US data centers, Office365Mon is available today via Germany data centers.

 logo

At Office365Mon.Com we’ve heard from customers of our Office 365 monitoring service that had certain data sovereignty restrictions placed upon them.  This means that in some areas, there are government regulations that require data for a company in that region, to be stored in that region.

In addition to that, today Office365Mon issues its health probes out of a US-based data center.  Customers can always (and in fact are encouraged) to augment that with our Distributed Probes and Diagnostics feature, which lets you issue probes from any location where you have users.  However, some folks were hoping to have our cloud-based probes issued from a data center closer to where their users live.

Today we’re happy to announce an option that solves both problems – you can now create Office365Mon subscriptions in regional data centers.  Our first data center is available now, and is located in Germany.  This means not only is your subscription created in Germany, and your health probes are issued out of Germany, but also all of the data we capture is also stored in that same German data center.  That allows you to meet data sovereignty requirements in that region, as well as potentially getting cloud-based probes closer to your users.

One of the first things to call out is that all of the features you get from our US-based service, you will also find in our German-based service.  So no matter where you go, you will find feature parity.  If you have users spread across the globe and want to create Office365Mon subscriptions in different geographies, that’s okay too.  One of the cool things we do is pull together data from all of your subscriptions in every data center when we show you our Power BI reports.  For example, here’s a screenshot the Outages report with data from every subscription in every region for our tenant:

powerbiall

Of course, one of the cool things about Power BI is that you also have a slew of filtering and report building features available to you.  Here’s a screenshot of that same report, only this time it’s filtered to show only data from the Office365Mon subscription that we have in Germany:

powerbifiltered

The net of this is that if you know Office365Mon today, it will look, work, and act exactly the same no matter what data center your subscription is located.

The next question we expect to get of course is – that’s great, but what if I want Office365Mon in a different geography?  The answer is…that’s great!  Email us and let us know what you are interested in, and we can provide you with an idea of when it can be done.  As long as the different regions have parity in the Azure features that Office365Mon requires, it should be possible to deploy Office365Mon to virtually any regional Azure data center.

There’s only one real difference with using Office365Mon in a regional data center – you have to work with our support team to enable you to get going.  If you contact us at support@office365mon.com, we will give you all of the details about the on-boarding process, pricing, etc.

We know that this has been in important issue for many of our European friends and customers, so I hope you’ll take a few minutes to take a look at our PDF from our US site or our German site.  Of course, you can also visit our US site directly at https://office365mon.com, or our new German site at https://office365mon.de.

Thanks as always for your great suggestions and ideas!
From Sunny Phoenix,

Steve

Now You Can Monitor OneDrive and Power BI with Office365Mon

Today we’ve released two new features that customers have been asking us about – monitoring for OneDrive for Business and Power BI.  These are just the latest set of services in an ever increasing stable of monitored features and services from Office365Mon.  Let’s take a quick look at each.

OneDrive for Business

Office365Mon has actually been able to monitor OneDrive for Business since our first release over two years ago.  However, many customers weren’t really aware of that and didn’t realize that when you configure monitoring for SharePoint Online, you could just tell it to go monitor a OneDrive site.  What we’ve done is to break OneDrive out as a separate monitored item on your Office365Mon subscription.  This gets you a couple of things – first, now you can monitor both a SharePoint Online site and a OneDrive site with the same subscription.  Second, it also allows us to give you a more granular breakdown of both performance and availability with your SharePoint Online tenant.  For example, here’s a report with the average performance across all Office365Mon customers for the primary Office 365 Services:

overallservice

As you can see with the yellow bar, now you can see what performance is like just on OneDrive sites vs. SharePoint Online sites from all of our customers.  Of course, you’ll also be able to see what performance is like just for your tenant in OneDrive.  We think breaking OneDrive out in this way will give you an even deeper view into the health and performance of your tenant, which is a great thing.

Power BI in Office 365

The second feature we added is brand new, and something that we’ve heard customers ask us about for a while now.  Power BI is increasingly becoming a critical part of the toolset that customers are using, so of course it’s important to know how well it’s performing and when it goes down.  Our new monitoring for Power BI does all of that, just as you’ve come to expect from Office365Mon.  The configuration of Power BI monitoring is drop dead simple, which is also something you’ve come to expect from us.  You literally click a single button – that’s it – as shown in this screenshot below:

powerbiconfig

Once you’ve enabled it, health probes begin a minute or two later; can’t get much easier than that!  Once we start collecting the data, details on performance and availability of Power BI show up in all of the same reports that you’ve already been using.  For example, here’s a screenshot of the recent health probes report, showing you the performance of your monitored resources:

perfmonchart

As you can see, you get the performance of your individual resources that are being monitored – including both Power BI and OneDrive – and that is overlaid on top of a bar chart with the overall numbers from all Office365Mon customers with the average performance for Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, OneDrive and Power BI.  Our goal is always to show you as much relevant data as possible and then give you the opportunity to drill down and filter as best suits your requirements.  Also, like all of our reports, you can add this to your own corporate intranet for anyone you want to be able to see, by using our Dashboard Reports feature.  Meanwhile, should Power BI go down, you can also take comfort in the fact that you’ll get all of the same notifications from us as you do today for all of your other monitored services.  Power BI is just another one of “the team” now, and is monitored just like all of the other features and services we’re keeping an eye on for you.

 

Try it Out

Both the OneDrive and Power BI monitoring features are available for you to try out now.  All existing Office365Mon customers as well as all new customers will have access to these features for 90 days.  New customers can go create an Office365Mon subscription at https://www.office365mon.com.  No payment information is required up front, and if you choose not to use it there’s nothing you need to do – after 90 days we just stop monitoring stuff for you.

For all Office365Mon paid subscriptions, we will continue to monitor OneDrive for you.  Power BI monitoring requires the Enterprise Platinum license.  If you have that, monitoring Power BI will continue for you; if you don’t have that license, you can upgrade to it at any time by going to our Payments page at https://www.office365mon.com/Products/Payments.

 

Thanks Again

As always, thanks again for the many terrific suggestions you all have provided.  We’re always looking for ways in which we can do a better job meeting your needs, and the best way to do that is for you to let us know what’s important to you.  Office365Mon really has a wide range of monitoring features now, so I hope if you haven’t tried it yet, or maybe if it’s been a while since you’ve looked at it, you’ll come by and take it out for a spin for 90 days.  We think you’ll find that it’s well worth the 2 minutes of your time to get things set up and going.

 

From Sunny Phoenix,

Steve